Category: Immigration/Deportation

Trump Will Have Blood on His Hands

Donald Trump’s more sophisticated defenders have long since mastered the art of pretending that the only thing that matters with his presidency is what it does, not what he says. But not all of the president’s defenders are quite as sophisticated. Some of them didn’t get the memo about taking Trump seriously but not literally. A few hear the phrase “enemy of the people” and are prepared to take the words to their logical conclusion. We are approaching a day when blood on the newsroom floor will be blood on the president’s hands.

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José was reunited with his son — but the 3-year-old is not the same

TRAUMA’S EMOTIONAL SCARS

“I didn’t eat, I didn’t sleep thinking about him,” José said of the time apart from José Jr. “When would I see him? Where could he be?”

Isbister said he was worried about the lasting effects the separations would have on families.

“The emotional scars that his son and even that he are exhibiting are apparent to the eye,” Isbister said of José. “I’m quite saddened to see that our government is perpetrating trauma and causing scars to families in our name.”

José said he would tell his son what happened when he is older, though he fears the separation will leave a permanent mark.

“I’m going to explain it … so he knows it was not my fault that he was separated, or that I had left him abandoned,” José said. “I am afraid that he’ll be left with problems.”

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Inside the Family Separation Legal Drama

“It is clear from Mr. Meekins’s Declaration that HHS either does not understand the Court’s orders or is acting in defiance of them,” Judge Sabraw said. He added that Meekins appeared to be providing cover for the government’s “lack of foresight and infrastructure necessary to remedy the harms” caused by separating families and that HHS appeared to be “operating in a vacuum, entirely divorced from the undisputed circumstances of this case.” Judge Sabraw then ordered the government to submit its plan for reunifying the children with their parents, which the government did on Sunday. 

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As Migrant Families Are Reunited, Some Children Don’t Recognize Their Mothers

PHOENIX — One mother had waited four months to wrap her arms around her little boy. Another had waited three months to see her little girl again.

When the reunions finally happened Tuesday in Phoenix, the mothers were met with cries of rejection from their children.

“He didn’t recognize me,” said Mirce Alba Lopez, 31, of her 3-year-old son, Ederson, her eyes welling up with tears. “My joy turned temporarily to sadness.”

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Judge Rejects Long Detentions of Migrant Families, Dealing Trump Another Setback

“The court clearly finds that the attorney general’s efforts to strip detained immigrant children of their fundamental rights were completely unfounded and based on an intentional misreading of the 1997 Flores agreement,” said Peter Schey, president of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, who was a co-lead counsel on the initial lawsuit, which was filed in 1985.

Contrary to assertions from the Trump administration, he said, nothing in the Flores agreement required separation of families. “On the contrary, the settlement has offered detained children the right to humane treatment and reasonably prompt release from custody, unless they are a flight risk or a danger, for some 20 years without incident,” he said.

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Governor Jay Inslee (D-WA) – Trump Administration Redefines Reunification to Avoid Complying with Court Orders

Unwilling to comply with court orders that require HHS to reunite immigrant children and their parents, the Trump administration is now fighting the browning of America by redefining “reunification” to include placement in long-term foster care.

At some point “inhumane” becomes “atrocity”? Are we there yet?

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RSS Migration Policy Institute – U.S. Immigration Policy Program

  • Dismantling and Reconstructing the U.S. Immigration System: A Catalog of Changes under the Trump Presidency July 30, 2020
    Now into its fourth year, the Trump administration has reshaped the U.S. immigration system in ways big and small via presidential proclamations, policy guidance, and regulatory change. This report offers a catalog of the more than 400 administrative changes undertaken in areas such as immigration enforcement, humanitarian admissions, DACA, and visa processing—including a look at […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Millions of U.S. Citizens Could Be Excluded under Trump Plan to Remove Unauthorized Immigrants from Census Data July 24, 2020
    The Trump administration's plan to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the 2020 Census data used to reapportion 435 congressional seats among the 50 states could misclassify as many as 20 million U.S. citizens, as the result of expected data-matching errors. The effects of this exclusion could be most pronounced in low-income urban and rural communities, reducing […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Brain Waste among U.S. Immigrants with Health Degrees: A Multi-State Profile July 21, 2020
    Across the United States, the skills of an estimated 263,000 immigrants and refugees with health-related degrees are going underutilized during a time of pandemic, with these health professionals either in low-skilled jobs or out of work. This fact sheet offers the first-ever state profiles of this population, including the states in which they live, the […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • A Bumpy Path to U.S. Citizenship: A Survey of Changing USCIS Practices July 16, 2020
    Marking the launch of a report on changed USCIS procedures that appear to be adding hurdles to the citizenship process, this discussion also examines the effects that the pandemic-related shutdown and a possible furlough of two-thirds of USCIS staff could have on the ability of would-be Americans to take the oath of citizenship. The conversation, […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • A Rockier Road to U.S. Citizenship? Findings of a Survey on Changing Naturalization Procedures July 14, 2020
    For the 9 million immigrants eligible to become U.S. citizens, changed naturalization adjudication practices and an agency mission shift undertaken by the Trump administration appear to be posing new hurdles. This report analyzes a survey of naturalization assistance providers from across the country, examining changes in how U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services interviews applicants, conducts […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • A Bumpy Path to U.S. Citizenship: A Survey of Changing USCIS Practices July 10, 2020
    Marking the launch of MPI report on USCIS’s evolving procedures for handling citizenship applications, this webinar focuses on the findings from a national survey of naturalization assistance providers. The discussion also examines the increasing obstacles to citizenship, and the effects the pandemic-related shutdown and USCIS financial turmoil could have on the ability of would-be Americans to […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • As #DefundThePolice Movement Gains Steam, Immigration Enforcement Spending and Practices Attract Scrutiny June 24, 2020
    Calls by activists to "defund the police," in the wake of a string of deadly encounters for Black community members, echo earlier demands to "abolish ICE" and reflect broader criticism of enforcement systems perceived as overly aggressive. Budgets have ballooned at federal immigration agencies and within the immigrant detention system as enforcement has become increasingly […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • USCIS Budget Implosion Owes to Far More than the Pandemic June 15, 2020
    Citing coronavirus-related disruptions, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services urged Congress to provide $1.2 billion to address its severe budget shortfall. Without this emergency infusion, the agency warned it might have to furlough up to 80 percent of its staff by mid-July 2020. Yet a deeper look at USCIS operations shows it was facing serious budget […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Cuban Immigrants in the United States in 2018 June 11, 2020
    Cuban immigration to the United States has slowed in recent years, rising by 2 percent from 2017 to 2018. Overall, Cubans represent 3 percent of all immigrants in the United States. Compared to the overall foreign- and U.S.-born populations, Cuban immigrants are less likely to be proficient in English, have lower educational attainment, and earn […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Beyond the Border: U.S.-Mexican Migration Accord Has Ushered in Sweeping Change in Mexico in Its First Year June 9, 2020
    Following months of rising Central American migration through Mexico to the United States, the U.S. and Mexican governments on June 7, 2019 signed a joint declaration pledging to work together to manage and reduce irregular migration. At the agreement’s one-year anniversary, MPI researchers engaged in discussion with former U.S. and Mexican Ambassadors and a veteran […]
    Migration Policy Institute

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