Category: Immigration/Deportation

Trump Will Have Blood on His Hands

Donald Trump’s more sophisticated defenders have long since mastered the art of pretending that the only thing that matters with his presidency is what it does, not what he says. But not all of the president’s defenders are quite as sophisticated. Some of them didn’t get the memo about taking Trump seriously but not literally. A few hear the phrase “enemy of the people” and are prepared to take the words to their logical conclusion. We are approaching a day when blood on the newsroom floor will be blood on the president’s hands.

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José was reunited with his son — but the 3-year-old is not the same

TRAUMA’S EMOTIONAL SCARS

“I didn’t eat, I didn’t sleep thinking about him,” José said of the time apart from José Jr. “When would I see him? Where could he be?”

Isbister said he was worried about the lasting effects the separations would have on families.

“The emotional scars that his son and even that he are exhibiting are apparent to the eye,” Isbister said of José. “I’m quite saddened to see that our government is perpetrating trauma and causing scars to families in our name.”

José said he would tell his son what happened when he is older, though he fears the separation will leave a permanent mark.

“I’m going to explain it … so he knows it was not my fault that he was separated, or that I had left him abandoned,” José said. “I am afraid that he’ll be left with problems.”

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Inside the Family Separation Legal Drama

“It is clear from Mr. Meekins’s Declaration that HHS either does not understand the Court’s orders or is acting in defiance of them,” Judge Sabraw said. He added that Meekins appeared to be providing cover for the government’s “lack of foresight and infrastructure necessary to remedy the harms” caused by separating families and that HHS appeared to be “operating in a vacuum, entirely divorced from the undisputed circumstances of this case.” Judge Sabraw then ordered the government to submit its plan for reunifying the children with their parents, which the government did on Sunday. 

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As Migrant Families Are Reunited, Some Children Don’t Recognize Their Mothers

PHOENIX — One mother had waited four months to wrap her arms around her little boy. Another had waited three months to see her little girl again.

When the reunions finally happened Tuesday in Phoenix, the mothers were met with cries of rejection from their children.

“He didn’t recognize me,” said Mirce Alba Lopez, 31, of her 3-year-old son, Ederson, her eyes welling up with tears. “My joy turned temporarily to sadness.”

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Judge Rejects Long Detentions of Migrant Families, Dealing Trump Another Setback

“The court clearly finds that the attorney general’s efforts to strip detained immigrant children of their fundamental rights were completely unfounded and based on an intentional misreading of the 1997 Flores agreement,” said Peter Schey, president of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, who was a co-lead counsel on the initial lawsuit, which was filed in 1985.

Contrary to assertions from the Trump administration, he said, nothing in the Flores agreement required separation of families. “On the contrary, the settlement has offered detained children the right to humane treatment and reasonably prompt release from custody, unless they are a flight risk or a danger, for some 20 years without incident,” he said.

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Governor Jay Inslee (D-WA) – Trump Administration Redefines Reunification to Avoid Complying with Court Orders

Unwilling to comply with court orders that require HHS to reunite immigrant children and their parents, the Trump administration is now fighting the browning of America by redefining “reunification” to include placement in long-term foster care.

At some point “inhumane” becomes “atrocity”? Are we there yet?

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RSS Migration Policy Institute – U.S. Immigration Policy Program

  • Beyond the Border: U.S.-Mexican Migration Accord Has Ushered in Sweeping Change in Mexico in Its First Year May 29, 2020
    On the one-year anniversary of the U.S.-Mexico migration cooperation agreement, this discussion will examine how the accord has reshaped Mexico’s immigration enforcement policies, exposed significant weaknesses in the systems for managing migration and protecting vulnerable migrants, and exacerbated precarious conditions for migrants along the U.S.-Mexico border. Speakers will also explore how pandemic-induced changes to mobility […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • The U.S. Stands Alone in Explicitly Basing Coronavirus-Linked Immigration Restrictions on Economic Grounds May 29, 2020
    The U.S. in April became the first country to explicitly justify immigration curbs not on grounds of COVID-19, but to protect the jobs of U.S. workers at a time of skyrocketing unemployment. A Trump administration proclamation limiting green cards for new arrivals was greeted coolly by the president's base, with many expecting the White House […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States May 13, 2020
    Immigrants make up a disproportionately high number of U.S. health-care workers, from doctors and nurses to home health aides. In 2018, more than 2.6 million immigrants worked in the U.S. health-care field. In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, immigrants have played a key role in the frontline response. This article explores the demographics of […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Barriers to COVID-19 Testing and Treatment: Immigrants without Health Coverage in the United States May 5, 2020
    As millions of U.S. workers lose jobs and the health insurance associated with them, Medicaid and similar programs are increasingly important for people seeking COVID-19 testing and treatment. Yet many low-income uninsured noncitizens, including green-card holders, are excluded from such programs because of their immigration status, as this fact sheet explores.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Vulnerable to COVID-19 and in Frontline Jobs, Immigrants Are Mostly Shut Out of U.S. Relief April 24, 2020
    On the frontlines of responding to the COVID-19 pandemic yet also more disproportionately affected by the virus and with reduced health-care access, immigrants in the United States have largely found themselves blocked from federal economic relief. As states and philanthropic groups seek to plug the gap, this article examines conditions and changing policies around immigration […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigration and the U.S.-Mexico Border during the Pandemic: A Conversation with Members of Congress April 22, 2020
    In this bipartisan discussion, two border-state members of Congress—Rep. Veronica Escobar and Rep. Dan Crenshaw—discuss the response to the coronavirus outbreak, how it is affecting the interconnected border region, and what the future might hold.  
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigration and the U.S.-Mexico Border during the Pandemic: A Conversation with Members of Congress April 17, 2020
    In this bipartisan discussion, two border-state members of Congress—Rep. Veronica Escobar and Rep. Dan Crenshaw—discuss the response to the coronavirus outbreak, how it is affecting the interconnected border region, and what the future might hold.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Venezuelan Immigrants in the United States April 10, 2020
    Until recently, the Venezuelan immigrant population in the United States was relatively small compared others from South America. But it has grown significantly, reaching 394,000 in 2018, as Venezuela's destabilization has driven large-scale emigration. Compared to other immigrants in the United States, Venezuelans have higher levels of education but are also more likely to live […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Humanitarian Protection in an Era of Pandemic April 8, 2020
    MPI and MPI Europe experts discuss the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on asylum systems in Europe and North America, as well as in developing regions, where 85 percent of refugees live. During this freeform conversation, our analysts also assess the implications for the principle of asylum and the future for a post-World War II […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigration and U.S. National Security: The State of Play Since 9/11 April 7, 2020
    The U.S. government has made important progress in shoring up weaknesses at the nexus of immigration and national security since September 11, 2001. But as new threats emerge and evolve—including public-health emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic—the question is whether the post-9/11 system is up to the task of meeting these challenges, as this report […]
    Migration Policy Institute

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