Category: Immigration/Deportation

Trump Will Have Blood on His Hands

Donald Trump’s more sophisticated defenders have long since mastered the art of pretending that the only thing that matters with his presidency is what it does, not what he says. But not all of the president’s defenders are quite as sophisticated. Some of them didn’t get the memo about taking Trump seriously but not literally. A few hear the phrase “enemy of the people” and are prepared to take the words to their logical conclusion. We are approaching a day when blood on the newsroom floor will be blood on the president’s hands.

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José was reunited with his son — but the 3-year-old is not the same

TRAUMA’S EMOTIONAL SCARS

“I didn’t eat, I didn’t sleep thinking about him,” José said of the time apart from José Jr. “When would I see him? Where could he be?”

Isbister said he was worried about the lasting effects the separations would have on families.

“The emotional scars that his son and even that he are exhibiting are apparent to the eye,” Isbister said of José. “I’m quite saddened to see that our government is perpetrating trauma and causing scars to families in our name.”

José said he would tell his son what happened when he is older, though he fears the separation will leave a permanent mark.

“I’m going to explain it … so he knows it was not my fault that he was separated, or that I had left him abandoned,” José said. “I am afraid that he’ll be left with problems.”

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Inside the Family Separation Legal Drama

“It is clear from Mr. Meekins’s Declaration that HHS either does not understand the Court’s orders or is acting in defiance of them,” Judge Sabraw said. He added that Meekins appeared to be providing cover for the government’s “lack of foresight and infrastructure necessary to remedy the harms” caused by separating families and that HHS appeared to be “operating in a vacuum, entirely divorced from the undisputed circumstances of this case.” Judge Sabraw then ordered the government to submit its plan for reunifying the children with their parents, which the government did on Sunday. 

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As Migrant Families Are Reunited, Some Children Don’t Recognize Their Mothers

PHOENIX — One mother had waited four months to wrap her arms around her little boy. Another had waited three months to see her little girl again.

When the reunions finally happened Tuesday in Phoenix, the mothers were met with cries of rejection from their children.

“He didn’t recognize me,” said Mirce Alba Lopez, 31, of her 3-year-old son, Ederson, her eyes welling up with tears. “My joy turned temporarily to sadness.”

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Judge Rejects Long Detentions of Migrant Families, Dealing Trump Another Setback

“The court clearly finds that the attorney general’s efforts to strip detained immigrant children of their fundamental rights were completely unfounded and based on an intentional misreading of the 1997 Flores agreement,” said Peter Schey, president of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, who was a co-lead counsel on the initial lawsuit, which was filed in 1985.

Contrary to assertions from the Trump administration, he said, nothing in the Flores agreement required separation of families. “On the contrary, the settlement has offered detained children the right to humane treatment and reasonably prompt release from custody, unless they are a flight risk or a danger, for some 20 years without incident,” he said.

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Governor Jay Inslee (D-WA) – Trump Administration Redefines Reunification to Avoid Complying with Court Orders

Unwilling to comply with court orders that require HHS to reunite immigrant children and their parents, the Trump administration is now fighting the browning of America by redefining “reunification” to include placement in long-term foster care.

At some point “inhumane” becomes “atrocity”? Are we there yet?

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RSS Migration Policy Institute – U.S. Immigration Policy Program

  • Navigating the Future of Work: The Role of Immigrant-Origin Workers in the Changing U.S. Economy October 27, 2020
    Immigrants and their U.S.-born children are key drivers of U.S. labor force growth. As some occupations grow and others decline, this report explores how these immigrant-origin workers fit within the changing world of work. It examines the degree to which workers from different racial/ethnic groups hold growing and declining jobs, and what changes in the […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Indian Immigrants in the United States October 15, 2020
    There are 2.7 million Indian immigrants in the United States, making them the second-largest immigrant group after Mexicans. This number has increased dramatically in recent years, growing 13-fold between 1980 and 2019. This article provides an overview of this population, which is more highly educated, likely to work in management positions, and higher-earning than the U.S. […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigrant-Origin Students in U.S. Higher Education: A Data Profile October 14, 2020
    Immigrants and the children of immigrants make up a large and growing segment of students at U.S. colleges and universities—up from 20 percent in 2000 to 28 percent in 2018. This fact sheet offers a first-of-its-kind profile of this population’s size and growth, identifies the top states for these students, and explores characteristics such as […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Broad and Blunt, the Trump Administration’s H-1B Changes Miss the Opportunity for Real Reform October 13, 2020
    The Trump administration's changes to the H-1B visa program are the most significant in three decades, promising to end the practice of replacing U.S. workers with highly skilled immigrants. While the problems the administration has identified and the interest in protecting U.S. workers are legitimate ones, its approach may cripple the H-1B program itself, as […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • The U.S. Presidential Campaign Cements Political Parties’ Deepening Schism on Immigration September 30, 2020
    In the United States, Republicans and Democrats are deeply divided on immigration. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have offered sharply diverging policy positions, and the outcome of the election is sure to have profound consequences for the U.S. immigration system. Yet this partisan divide is relatively new. Just two decades ago, […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • College-Educated Immigrants in the United States September 15, 2020
    Nearly 13 million immigrants have a four-year college degree or better. But these highly educated immigrants are not spread evenly throughout the labor market. They make up disproportionate shares of certain jobs, especially in the science and technology fields, accounting for 45 percent of software developers, 42 percent of physical scientists, and 29 percent of […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • The U.S. Immigration Policymaker-in-Chief: The Long History of Executive Authority over Immigration September 12, 2020
    Top legal scholars discuss the Trump administration’s substantial use of executive power to change the country’s course on immigration, how this compares to past administrations, and how the president’s role in immigration policy could be carefully considered and reimagined.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • The Digital Divide Hits U.S. Immigrant Households Disproportionately during the COVID-19 Pandemic September 3, 2020
    The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the effects of the so-called digital divide for U.S. immigrants and other groups with reduced online connectivity. Internet access and the skills to navigate digital environments have become even more critical for work, education, and health care during the public-health crisis, yet immigrants make up a disproportionately large share of […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • The U.S. Immigration Policymaker-in-Chief: The Long History of Executive Authority over Immigration August 31, 2020
    This discussion examines the long tradition of the U.S. president as immigration policymaker in chief, the Trump administration’s substantial use of executive power to change the country’s course on immigration, and how the president’s role in immigration policy is a inevitability that should be carefully considered and reimagined in any blueprint for immigration reform or […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigration Enforcement and the Mental Health of Latino High School Students August 31, 2020
    This study explores the relationship between immigration enforcement and the mental health of Latino high school students, finding that majorities surveyed in both high- and low-enforcement environments reported fear that someone close to them could be deported, with resulting symptoms of conditions such as depression and PTSD. The report provides examples of how schools are […]
    Migration Policy Institute

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