Category: Immigration/Deportation

Trump Will Have Blood on His Hands

Donald Trump’s more sophisticated defenders have long since mastered the art of pretending that the only thing that matters with his presidency is what it does, not what he says. But not all of the president’s defenders are quite as sophisticated. Some of them didn’t get the memo about taking Trump seriously but not literally. A few hear the phrase “enemy of the people” and are prepared to take the words to their logical conclusion. We are approaching a day when blood on the newsroom floor will be blood on the president’s hands.

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José was reunited with his son — but the 3-year-old is not the same

TRAUMA’S EMOTIONAL SCARS

“I didn’t eat, I didn’t sleep thinking about him,” José said of the time apart from José Jr. “When would I see him? Where could he be?”

Isbister said he was worried about the lasting effects the separations would have on families.

“The emotional scars that his son and even that he are exhibiting are apparent to the eye,” Isbister said of José. “I’m quite saddened to see that our government is perpetrating trauma and causing scars to families in our name.”

José said he would tell his son what happened when he is older, though he fears the separation will leave a permanent mark.

“I’m going to explain it … so he knows it was not my fault that he was separated, or that I had left him abandoned,” José said. “I am afraid that he’ll be left with problems.”

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Inside the Family Separation Legal Drama

“It is clear from Mr. Meekins’s Declaration that HHS either does not understand the Court’s orders or is acting in defiance of them,” Judge Sabraw said. He added that Meekins appeared to be providing cover for the government’s “lack of foresight and infrastructure necessary to remedy the harms” caused by separating families and that HHS appeared to be “operating in a vacuum, entirely divorced from the undisputed circumstances of this case.” Judge Sabraw then ordered the government to submit its plan for reunifying the children with their parents, which the government did on Sunday. 

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As Migrant Families Are Reunited, Some Children Don’t Recognize Their Mothers

PHOENIX — One mother had waited four months to wrap her arms around her little boy. Another had waited three months to see her little girl again.

When the reunions finally happened Tuesday in Phoenix, the mothers were met with cries of rejection from their children.

“He didn’t recognize me,” said Mirce Alba Lopez, 31, of her 3-year-old son, Ederson, her eyes welling up with tears. “My joy turned temporarily to sadness.”

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Judge Rejects Long Detentions of Migrant Families, Dealing Trump Another Setback

“The court clearly finds that the attorney general’s efforts to strip detained immigrant children of their fundamental rights were completely unfounded and based on an intentional misreading of the 1997 Flores agreement,” said Peter Schey, president of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, who was a co-lead counsel on the initial lawsuit, which was filed in 1985.

Contrary to assertions from the Trump administration, he said, nothing in the Flores agreement required separation of families. “On the contrary, the settlement has offered detained children the right to humane treatment and reasonably prompt release from custody, unless they are a flight risk or a danger, for some 20 years without incident,” he said.

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Governor Jay Inslee (D-WA) – Trump Administration Redefines Reunification to Avoid Complying with Court Orders

Unwilling to comply with court orders that require HHS to reunite immigrant children and their parents, the Trump administration is now fighting the browning of America by redefining “reunification” to include placement in long-term foster care.

At some point “inhumane” becomes “atrocity”? Are we there yet?

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RSS Migration Policy Institute – U.S. Immigration Policy Program

  • Is U.S.-Mexico Cooperation on Migration Possible? April 17, 2019
    Over recent months, the number of Central American migrants apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border has surged, presenting a critical challenge in the relationship between the two neighboring countries. Experts from a Study Group on U.S.-Mexico Migration convened by El Colegio de México and MPI discuss current trends, policies, and politics surrounding migration from the Northern […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Children of Immigrants and Child Welfare Systems: Key Policy and Practice April 16, 2019
    Marking the release of a new report, this webinar examines the intersection between immigration and child welfare systems and promising child welfare policies and agency approaches to address the needs of children of immigrants and their families.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • International vs. National Protection for Refugees: Diverging Trends? April 10, 2019
    MPI's Kathleen Newland, Refugee Council USA's Mary Giovagnoli, and David Scott FitzGerald, author of Refuge beyond Reach, discuss how and why international and national responses to the rising challenge of refugee displacement are diverging. They examine what lies ahead for the Global Compact on Refugees and how adjustments to asylum policies in many high-income democracies are narrowing the paths to […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Is U.S.-Mexico Cooperation on Migration Possible? April 8, 2019
    As the numbers of Central American migrants crossing into Mexico and the United States rises—putting migration front and center in the U.S.-Mexico relationship again—this event examines the opportunites for cooperation between the two countries, along with ways to improve U.S. and Mexican asylum systems, create new approaches to labor migration, address smuggling networks, and modernize […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Policy Options for Responding to Changing Migration Flows at the Southwest Border April 3, 2019
    Testimony of Andrew Selee, President of MPI, before Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs on April 4, 2019 regarding response to changing migration flows at the Southwest border.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Policy Solutions to Address Crisis at Border Exist, But Require Will and Staying Power to Execute April 1, 2019
    Closing the U.S.-Mexico border and cutting off aid to Central America would only feed the crisis unfolding at key points along the U.S.-Mexico border. This commentary outlines a range of immediate and long-term policy responses that would more effectively address the complex mix of factors fueling rising Central American migration to the United States.
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Remain in Mexico Plan Echoes Earlier U.S. Policy to Deter Haitian Migration March 28, 2019
    Remain in Mexico—the Trump administration policy aimed at deterring the rising numbers of migrants from Central America by requiring them to stay in Mexico through most of their U.S. asylum adjudication process—bears striking similarities to U.S. policy in the 1980s and 1990s that sought to discourage Haitians from making the sea journey to the United […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • International vs. National Protection for Refugees: Diverging Trends? March 27, 2019
    MPI's Kathleen Newland, Refugee Council USA's Mary Giovagnoli, and David Scott FitzGerald, author of Refuge beyond Reach, discuss how and why international and national responses to the rising challenge of refugee displacement are diverging. Topics include what lies ahead for the Global Compact on Refugees and how adjustments to asylum policies in many high-income democracies are narrowing the paths […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • Immigrant-Origin Adults without Postsecondary Credentials: A 50-State Profile March 20, 2019
    With immigrants and their U.S.-born children poised to be the main source of labor-force growth, these adults are an important target for efforts to build the skills of the U.S. workforce to meet the knowledge-based economy of tomorrow. This fact sheet and state data snapshots explore the characteristics of adults without an academic degree or […]
    Migration Policy Institute
  • More Than a DREAM (Act), Less Than a Promise March 12, 2019
    The first bill introduced in the 116th Congress to offer a path to legal status to DREAMers, the American Dream and Promise Act of 2019, could legalize nearly 2.7 million unauthorized immigrants brought to the United States as children, as well as those eligible for Temporary Protected Status or Deferred Enforced Departure, as this commentary explains.
    Migration Policy Institute

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